About Us

Aims and Structure of the Scottish Institute for Policing Research

 

The SIPR Mission

Established in 2007, the Scottish Institute for Policing Research (SIPR)’s mission is to support independent, multi-disciplinary policing research to enable evidence informed policy & practice.


SIPR aims to:

  1. Facilitate excellent, independent research of relevance to policing (RESEARCH);
  2. Engage in a range of knowledge exchange activities to strengthen the evidence base on which policy and practice are improved & developed (KNOWLEDGE EXCHANGE);
  3. Nurture a culture of learning & innovation (LEARNING AND INNOVATION);
  4. Promote the development of national & international links with researcher, practitioner and policing communities (PARTNERSHIPS).

 

5 year plan (2019 - 2024) objectives

Within these four aims we will strive to achieve the following:

  1. RESEARCH
  • Increase policing research capacity under three strategic research priority themes in order to shape strategic focus and respond to external drivers.
  • Enhance excellence of SIPR policing research through improvements to quality assurance processes.

 2. KNOWLEDGE EXCHANGE

  • Facilitate events and enhance knowledge exchange tools.
  • Support evidence to practice routes and develop pathways to enable and document impact.
  1. LEARNING AND INNOVATION
  • Nurture learning and innovation in policing organisations and universities, supporting the postgraduate community and the next generation of researchers and practitioners.
  • Foster links between higher education and policing organisations and partners to support training, education and innovation.

 4. PARTNERSHIPS

  • Facilitate networking and collaboration between academics, practitioners, and policy makers nationally and internationally.
  • Develop strategic links with new and existing partners.

 


Achieving our aims: Enablers and Mechanisms

Structure

SIPR is composed of the following governance structure.


The Board of Governance have overall reasonability and final approval for all SIPR activities and operations although several responsibilities are delegated to the Executive Committee and Leadership team where appropriate. The Terms of Reference for the BoG can be accessed here.

Download the BoG Terms of Reference

The role of the International Advisory Committee is to provide advice on the strategic direction of SIPR with respect to its key aims of conducting relevant research, making evidence-based contributions to policing policy and practice, and capacity building. The International Advisory Committee will also help identify opportunities for SIPR to engage in research and knowledge transfer activity in partnership with others at both national and international levels.

The running of SIPR will be led by the SIPR Leadership Team, with much activity delivered through the four networks. Additionally, the leadership team are responsible for engaging the wider SIPR membership from across all member organisations in order to capitalise on the skills and experience of the collective policing research network throughout Scotland.

The SIPR Leadership Team will develop a draft annual operational plan and the Executive Committee will contribute to its development and an aligned budget. Plans will be presented to the Board of Governance for approval.

A core budget will be assigned for the annual running of SIPR, and decisions will be made regarding budgets aligned with the operational plan on an annual basis, in line with the academic year. An annual report which will summarise the activity and value of SIPR will be prepared for the Board of Governance.


Mechanisms and Measurements

(SIPR's DRAFT Strategic Research Objectives 2019-2024)

The diagram below illustrates how the aims and activities link together, and provides some key measurements to indicate how we will demonstrate success against these objectives.

Underlying the direction and achievement of each of these objectives are the key strategic research priorities. The following three priorities have been developed in order to inform SIPR’s strategic direction and investment over the coming five years and will allow us to consolidate our activities in policing research.

  1. Policing and health, safety and well-being, including for example:
    • Prevention;
    • Role, value and impact of policing within the wider system;
    • Gender Based Violence;
    • Mental health;
    • Substance use;
    • Public protection;
    • Missing persons;
    • Community Safety and harm reduction;
    • Local policing, visibility and accessibility;
    • Police-community relations; and
    • Public confidence and legitimacy.
  2. Technology and digital policing, including for example:
    • Frontline policing and technology;
    • Digital contact, online visibility & accessibility;
    • Big Data and predictive policing;
    • Surveillance;
    • Cyber enabled/ dependent crime;
    • Cyber security;
    • Public protection;
    • Maximising intelligence;
    • Digital Forensic investigation; and
    • Social, ethical and legal considerations.
  3. Policing systems capability and resilience including for example:
    • Workforce;
    • Support for operational policing;
    • Retention/ recruitment;
    • Business change/ change management;
    • Culture, diversity and inclusion;
    • Staff well-being;
    • Leadership;
    • Training, learning and education;
    • Demand;
    • Data; and
    • Investigation.